Gil Scott-Heron – Pieces Of A Man

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Rebellious, painful, filled with bitterness and tenderness, sometimes optimistic and even naive, rooted in the blues and jazz influences to which Scott-Heron referred to as “bluesology, the science of how things feel”, this album Heron definitely sings with ache in his voice. Pieces of a Man, released 1971 for Flying Dutchman record label, set a standard for vocal artistry and political awareness that few musicians will ever match. It is one of Scott-Heron’s most critically acclaimed albums and one of the Flying Dutchman label’s best-selling LP’s. Enjoy!

Gilbert “Gil” Scott-Heron (April 1, 1949 – May 27, 2011) was an American soul and jazz poet, musician, and author, known primarily for his work as a spoken word performer in the 1970s and ’80s. His collaborative efforts with musician Brian Jackson featured a musical fusion of jazz, blues, and soul, as well as lyrical content concerning social and political issues of the time, delivered in both rapping and melismatic vocal styles by Scott-Heron. His music, most notably on Pieces of a Man and Winter In America in the early 1970s, influenced and helped engender later African-American music genres such as hip hop and neo soul.

Track list:

01. The Revolution Will Not Be Televised
02. Save The Children
03. Lady Day And John Coltrane
04. Home Is Where The Hatred Is
05. When You Are Who You Are
06. I Think I’ll Call It Morning
07. Pieces Of A Man
08. A Sign Of The Ages
09. Or Down You Fall
10. The Needle’s Eye
11. The Prisoner

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